Continue to show up

As I flew out of DC today and looked back down our National Mall, I imagined all the young people that would fill the spaces in between the monuments and buildings in the hours to come. I remembered how Marine One darted over my head by the Washington Monument yesterday, carrying the president to a Mar-A-Lago-bound Air Force One. It struck me that those who create a meaningful life are those who SHOW UP. Not just for the main event, but who continue to work, to learn, to improve themselves, and to give, day in and day out.

I applaud and am awed at all the young people who showed up in our capitol and around the country today. You showed up to the big event. Now continue to show up every day. In your classes. In your communities. In the voting booths. In your own hearts. In everything you do.

Who is authoring your personal checklist?

There’s something about the human brain and lists. We crave order, delineation, and bite-sized chunks of information. A decade of social media exposure has only intensified this natural urge in us. We’re bombarded with bullet points and listicles by which we can judge our lives.

listicles

I’ll often find myself falling into the judgement trap. We’re doing great. We got 8 out of 10 on this one. Our relationship passed the test! But …. wait … that’s only 80%. That’s a B-. That sucks. Nobody wants a B- minus relationship. Here’s another list, we got 90% on this one. Whew!

Continue reading Who is authoring your personal checklist?

Getting out of a negative rut

If we worry, creating more unease and anxiety, we become stellar worriers since our brain is responding, making it easier for us to worry each time we do it, thus creating our default mode living.

While I’m generally someone who finds silver linings in almost any bad predicament, I know I can get stuck in a negative rut (especially when it comes to our current politics!)

We all need a good rant when people and situations challenge us. The danger lives when these rants become our daily outlook.

Why we’re here

Last year, I planted a batch of red onions in the middle of our raised vegetable garden, but they were a complete failure as a crop. At the end of the season, I thought I’d ripped them all out of the soil. But this afternoon, I found one sprouting after surviving our long Illinois winter. Thoroughly impressed with its resiliency, I posted the photo to Facebook.

Soon afterward, I received a comment: “Thank you so much for the vicarious gardening. I’ve had some frustrating health issues the past several months, and your posts really do improve my outlook and make me feel like I am not missing everything. Many, many thanks.”

Continue reading Why we’re here